Marbury v. Madison: The Most Important Decision in American Constitutional Law

History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Statutes at Large, Treaties and Agreements Library, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

This past Tuesday, the Affordable Care Act returned to the Supreme Court for the third time. Opponents argue that the health insurance mandate included in the legislation is unconstitutional, and that the entire act should therefore be struck down.

You may be wondering, from where does the Supreme Court derive this power? To discover the answer, travel with HeinOnline back to the turn of the nineteenth century.

The Election of 1800

This story starts with a presidential election, which, we have to say, is a much more enjoyable phenomenon to look back on than to experience. The main candidates were incumbent President John Adams—a Federalist favoring strong central government—and Vice President Thomas Jefferson…

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Handling the Supreme Court Vacancy: Is Court Packing a Viable Option?

American History, Law, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

In the wake of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, some Democrats have pushed the idea of expanding the number of justices on the Supreme Court. The concept—known as “court packing”—has caught fire in some circles, particularly following the announcement of President Trump’s official nominee pick, Amy Coney Barrett. A conservative-leaning circuit judge, Barrett’s confirmation would reshape the ideology of the Supreme Court and could hinder it from making more liberal decisions.

Why does the Supreme Court only have nine justices, anyway? What is court packing, really? Is it a feasible option for the Democrats? Why should we care? Allow HeinOnline to help answer all these questions and more using the databases below:

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Everything You Need to Know About Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The recent passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg opened up a seat on the United States Supreme Court, just weeks before the presidential election. On September 26th, President Donald Trump nominated Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative federal appeals court judge, to succeed Ginsburg. If confirmed, Barrett would keep the number of women serving on the Court at three, joining Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. She would also become the youngest member of the Court. Most importantly, she would likey cement a 6-3 conservative majority. Today we will explore Barrett’s career and where she stands on major constitutional issues using HeinOnline…

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I Dissent: The Life and Legacy of the Incomparable Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Author Profile Pages, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

This past weekend, the nation lost one of its biggest social justice warriors, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. After serving on the Supreme Court of the United States for nearly three decades, Ginsburg passed away from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer at the age of 87. She was the second female justice, after Sandra Day O’Connor, to serve on the Court and was well known for her fiery dissents, her tireless fight for gender equality, and her ability to overcome adversity. Although she weighed only 100 lbs, this 5’1″ feminist icon was larger than life.

The Beginning of Greatness

Ruth Bader Ginsburg attended Cornell…

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Unpacking the History of American and International Child Rights

Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, Session Laws, Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Supreme Court, United Nations, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

What is a child? It may seem like a silly question, but the answer is more nuanced than one might think. In biology, the term refers to the state of the human being between birth and puberty. Legally, it?refers to a person younger than a predetermined age of majority—the point in time when a person can take legal control over their actions and decisions. Symbolically, children have become much more. Over the past several hundred years, the child has become not only an allegory for innocence and the embodiment of freedom, but also a shining beacon of hope for future generations widely considered in need of adult protection.

Pre-20th Century Children

Though this view of the child is one we’re all familiar with now…

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Reigning Supreme: All About the Highest Court in the United States

Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The Supreme Court of the United States, otherwise known as SCOTUS, is the highest tribunal in the nation for all cases and controversies arising under the Constitution. It marks the boundaries of authority between state and nation, state and state, and government and citizen. Although SCOTUS receives approximately 7,000-8,000 petitions each term, the justices grant and hear oral arguments for about 80 cases annually. Let’s take a closer look at SCOTUS and see what unique resources you can find in HeinOnline.

Who Makes Up SCOTUS

The Supreme Court was established by Article III of the Constitution…

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A Fathers’ Day Investigation of the Fathers’ Rights Movement

Law, Law Journal Library, National Survey of State Laws, Session Laws, Subject Compilations of State Laws, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

Family law is an area of the legal field concerning matters relating to marriage and partnership, divorce, adoption, surrogacy, child protection from abuse and neglect, and other domestic issues. In the last century or so, the transformation of certain definitions (e.g. wife, marriage, gender) and the recognition of women’s rights have dramatically changed the practice. Over the past few decades, one group has made it their mission to reform family law and the family court system further—fathers. Join us as we use HeinOnline to investigate the history of family law and the relatively new fathers’ rights movement.

Before We Get Started

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post…

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Something Strange in the Neighborhood: The Ghostbusters Ruling

Fastcase, Law, Law Journal Library, Popular Culture
Tara Kibler

Did you know there was actually a case in which a house was declared legally haunted? This Halloween, expand your knowledge of spooky scary case law. Read all about the?Ghostbusters?ruling below.

Hauntings on the Hudson

In the late 1960s, a rundown Victorian house sat vacant, nestled atop a cliff overlooking the Hudson River. Built more than 70 years earlier, the mansion boasted nearly 5,000 square feet, intricate woodwork, and plenty of old-world charm.

Enter George and Helen Ackley, a married couple looking for a spacious waterfront home for themselves and their four children…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: The Impeachment of Bill Clinton

American History, Criminal Justice, Exploring HeinOnline, Law, Political Science, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

As of this month, it’s been a year since our initial release of the Serial Set in HeinOnline … celebrate with another installment of our Secrets of the Serial Set series! This month, we dive into the events surrounding the 1998 impeachment of President William Jefferson Clinton.

Secrets of the Serial Set?is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the?United States Congressional Serial Set. Join us each month to explore notable events in U.S. history using the primary sources themselves. Grab a seat and prepare to be blown away by what the?Serial Set?has to offer…

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The Nuremberg Trials and Their Profound Impact on International Law

Criminal Justice, Foreign Affairs, Highlights in History, Human Rights, International Law, Law, Law Journal Library, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

Seventy-three years ago today, the International Military Tribunal of the Nuremberg trials prosecuted the major parties responsible for the Holocaust and other World War II atrocities. The creation of the Nuremberg trials, their framework, and their outcomes were not only unprecedented but highly controversial. Learn about the trials and their impact with HeinOnline’s History of International Law database.

History of International Law*
Equipped with nearly 2,000 titles and more than 1.2 million pages of content dating back to 1690, History of International Law covers a variety of subjects such as war and peace, law of the sea, international arbitration, events at the Hague…

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